SE

CHANGES TO CLEAN SCOOP CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS

We have had horrible cooperation from the weather for the first 3 events and our on the air time has been limited so the club decided to change the qualification for the certificate. Now you only need to QSL 5 of 7 of the Special Events to get the clean scoop certificate !!

Good Luck and 73 from SEKARC

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Saturday, March 1, 2014

Foxhunting in North Carolina

Photo From http://www.salisburypost.com
Quoted from the article posted on Salisbury.com, be sure and read the whole article from their site. I post this so that some of you that are new to Amateur Radio and those that do not know much about "Foxhunting". Hopefully in 2014, SEKARC can develop a simlar activity!

SALISBURY — Every month, members of the Rowan Amateur Radio Society, plus anybody else who wants to go along for the ride, meet up in town and go fox hunting.

It’s not what you think. This “fox” doesn’t run, for starters.

Ralph Brown, member of the Rowan Amateur Radio Society, holds up his antenna, ready to take a bearing at the start of the monthly fox hunt. Ralph Brown, member of the Rowan Amateur Radio Society, holds up his antenna, ready to take a bearing at the start of the monthly fox hunt.

The ‘fox’ in the Rowan Amateur Radio Society’s monthly fox hunt is this 5-watt radio transmitter, mounted in an old ammunition can. The monthly hidden transmitter hunts help amateur radio operators hone their skills — and no license is required to go hunting. The ‘fox’ in the Rowan Amateur Radio Society’s monthly fox hunt is this 5-watt radio transmitter, mounted in an old ammunition can. The monthly hidden transmitter hunts help amateur radio operators hone their skills — and no license is required to go hunting.

It’s a 5-watt radio transmitter, packed into an old ammunition can.

The object of the game is to find the transmitter, which a member hides somewhere in Rowan County.

Members meet at a central location. Once the “fox” goes live, they get their bearings, then take off in cars and trucks.

It’s a race against time, but it’s also a test of skill to see who can find the “fox.”

And, in an emergency, those skills can count.

Amateur radio volunteers can use those triangulation skills to find illegal transmitters or sources of interference — even to locate radio beacons on downed aircraft.

(SEE MORE HERE)




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