SE

CHANGES TO CLEAN SCOOP CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS

We have had horrible cooperation from the weather for the first 3 events and our on the air time has been limited so the club decided to change the qualification for the certificate. Now you only need to QSL 5 of 7 of the Special Events to get the clean scoop certificate !!

Good Luck and 73 from SEKARC

SE link

Monday, April 22, 2013

Meeting Saturday & Samuel Morse

Saturday the 27th is our next meeting of the Southeast Kansas Amateur Radio Club. We will be meeting at Hardee's at 9am.

If you need directions, we will have a radio present and tuned in to the Pittsburg repeater 146.94. As we have mentioned previously, after the meeting we will be heading over to either Lakeside or Lincoln Park for those that would like to do some remote work. Everyone is welcome to come  along, bring your gear if interested!

Club member Tom N2UHC pointed out to me that Saturday is the birth date of the man that invented Morse Code. What a perfect day to make some contacts using that method.

Samuel Finley Breese Morse
Excerpt from Wikipedia: Morse encountered the problem of getting a telegraphic signal to carry over more than a few hundred yards of wire. His breakthrough came from the insights of Professor Leonard Gale, who taught chemistry at New York University (a personal friend of Joseph Henry). With Gale's help, Morse introduced extra circuits or relays at frequent intervals and was soon able to send a message through ten miles (16 km) of wire. This was the great breakthrough he had been seeking. Morse and Gale were soon joined by an enthusiastic young man, Alfred Vail, who had excellent skills, insights and money.

At the Speedwell Ironworks in Morristown, New Jersey on January 11, 1838, Morse and Vail made the first public demonstration of the electric telegraph. Although Morse and Alfred Vail had done most of the research and development in the ironworks facilities, they chose a nearby factory house as the demonstration site. Without the repeater,[12] the range of the telegraph was limited to two miles (3 km), and the inventors had pulled two miles (3 km) of wires inside the factory house through an elaborate scheme. The first public transmission, with the message "A patient waiter is no loser", was witnessed by a mostly local crowd.

Original Telegraph

Birthplace of Morse, Charlestown, MA. ca.1898 photo
See you all Saturday !!! Don't worry if you don't know CW, I surely do not so there will be many other modes being sent and received Saturday afternoon!

73's and BTU, this is Kilo Delta Zero Sierra Echo Golf.

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